22 8 / 2014

Trigger warning for discussion of abortion.

About an hour ago, I found out that my best friend is pregnant. Not last week, not last night—this afternoon. 47 minutes ago, according to my iPhone text log. Of course, I called her the instant the black and white sonogram pic popped up on my screen and we did the excited girly-screaming thing and then the obligatory “When did you find out/how did you tell Mark* (her husband)/who else already knows…” chatter went on for a half hour. And then we said I love you & goodbye because she has a mile-long list of other people to tell today. She is 9 weeks along, and I am so effing thrilled for her. But I am also finding this deep, little patch of sadness finding root inside, and I already wish it would just go away.

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22 8 / 2014

Is the ‘Orphan Black’ World One Big Metaphor For the Patriarchy?
In many ways, Orphan Black seems like a classic science fiction plot—science has run amok, humans pay the consequences. But wrapped inside this broad perspective is a representation of patriarchy’s effects on women’s lives. Despite their shared genetics, Orphan Black emphasizes the personality differences between the clones, from uptight soccer mom Alison, to brilliant scientist Cosima, to mad, traumatized Helena. (I should note here the mesmerizing performance of Tatiana Maslany, who plays all the clones; she makes you believe each one is a distinct person.) Despite the characters’s individuality, they find themselves equally subject to exterior forces that deem them less than human and therefore able to be owned, manipulated, and objectified…
Read more on Feminspire

Is the ‘Orphan Black’ World One Big Metaphor For the Patriarchy?

In many ways, Orphan Black seems like a classic science fiction plot—science has run amok, humans pay the consequences. But wrapped inside this broad perspective is a representation of patriarchy’s effects on women’s lives. Despite their shared genetics, Orphan Black emphasizes the personality differences between the clones, from uptight soccer mom Alison, to brilliant scientist Cosima, to mad, traumatized Helena. (I should note here the mesmerizing performance of Tatiana Maslany, who plays all the clones; she makes you believe each one is a distinct person.) Despite the characters’s individuality, they find themselves equally subject to exterior forces that deem them less than human and therefore able to be owned, manipulated, and objectified…

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22 8 / 2014

Feminism began in places where female-gendered persons were being subjected to discrimination, marginalization, oppression, enslavement, eradication, and other violence. Historically, in most parts of the world, female persons were considered less than men, property of men, and even less than human. This sexism continues in the majority of the world today (and anyone telling you that things aren’t that bad is really just telling you that they don’t experience sexism, marginalization or subjugation directly and don’t care to advocate for those who do).

So, yes, Feminism advocates for female persons to have equal rights with non-female persons. Feminism advocates for equal rights for all persons regardless of gender, because gender is not an acceptable basis for discrimination. To advocate that gender is not an acceptable basis for discrimination is to advocate that sex, orientation, age, nationality, socio-economic status, literacy, ability, and so on are also not acceptable bases for discrimination. Many of us reading this would agree: human rights are for everyone. However, violations of basic human rights, including outright acts of enslavement and oppression, happen every day everywhere on the planet. How does change get enacted? Through action. You start a movement. You prepare for battle.

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22 8 / 2014

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We’re not stupid, and most teenagers and children aren’t either if you give them a chance and try to explain a situation to them. Seriously, there must be something more productive and positive to say when faced with tough questions than “you’re too young to understand that.”

These types of responses shut the younger person down completely. It closes the conversation because it doesn’t allow a valid response. No one can agree or disagree with this statement because the future is unknown. I might understand when I’m older, I might never understand, we don’t know. And you can’t predict my future, so please try not to, especially if you’re going to shut me down in the present. I honestly never know what to say when people tell me this. There is nothing that I can think of that will satisfy me while continuing the conversation.

"

22 8 / 2014

Here’s the thing about saying this to someone younger than you: it can make them feel like you are giving up on them. It also serves to underestimate the person you are speaking to. When I hear someone say this to me I think one of two things, 1) they think that I’m too stupid or not empathetic enough to understand them or what they are going through right now, or 2) they are too lazy to explain their feelings or situation to me and therefore don’t find very much value in speaking with me in the first place. It comes with a certain assumption of superiority, “I am older and therefore know more and can thus tell you what you will and will not understand when you are also older.” Just stop.

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22 8 / 2014

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Hashtivism has changed how I see and live in the world. And I know I’m not the only one. If you ask me, the only lazy or ineffective thing about online activism is the blanket criticism of it. Don’t like what you see on your feed? Do something about it. Reading what others have to say, sharing your observations when relevant, and starting conversations with your friends–whether online or offline–is one way to begin. Is that “philanthropy”? Is that “activism”? Is that “organizing”? Does it really matter?! It’s dialogue. A place where change is born.

#AndthatsallIhavetosayaboutthat.

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22 8 / 2014

I suggest that, instead of criticizing online action, we pause and see what we can learn from it, listen to those participating in it, and build upon it when campaigns such as the #IceBucketChallenge (or more political hashtag campaigns like #IfTheyGunnedMeDown, #SolidarityIsForWhiteWomen, or #NotMyChristianLeader) make their way into our circles.

I, for one, am grateful to live in a digital age where people in all corners of the globe are able to dialogue with each other about important issues, report events as they are happening on the ground, and shape how we talk to each other about the need for political and social transformation. Thanks to the #IceBucketChallenge, I learned what ALS is and how to donate to ALS research programs. Thanks to #IfTheyGunnedMeDown, I have become more acutely aware of the deadly mix that is racism, police brutality, and white supremacist media bias. Thanks to #SolidarityIsForWhiteWomen, I have expanded my understanding of intersectional feminism. Thanks to #NotMyChristianLeader, I have become more sensitive to the trauma experienced by marginalized individuals and groups in the church.

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22 8 / 2014

feminspire:

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Meanwhile, white folks can proudly stroll through a Target store with assault rifles hanging off their shoulders, knowing that they will not get shot by a police officer. White people who refuse to pay grazing fees in Nevada can defend their assumed right to do so by

22 8 / 2014

thatirishnerd said: Best blog I've found in a while <3 Thank you

And we <3 you!

22 8 / 2014

the-funny-pics said: I don't see any reason the friend zone is wrong, unless you're an a-hole who thinks the girl owes you something

The Friendzone isn’t a thing. Never will be.

21 8 / 2014

triciamaxwell said: One word: HUMANISM.

Nope: http://feminspire.com/feminists-are-not-humanists-and-we-should-not-be-renamed/

21 8 / 2014

theultimatewarlord said: Why do you feel oppressed is it because you're just power hungry women who feed off your hatred for men?

Yes.

21 8 / 2014

Feminspire.com is seeking new writers to join our staff.

We’re looking for passionate, smart, creative women who have a lot to say. No previous experience required. 

Feminspire is a volunteer-based publication with a staff of dozens of women from around the world. We have an awesome and supportive team, and we’re very excited to add more people to our community. If you’re interested in growing with us, there are a lot of opportunities to do so!

If interested, please send a brief email to info@feminspire.com with an article pitch and writing sample.  

OR just send us a link to your blog/tumblr! We’re open to reposting great content as well.

21 8 / 2014

(via jenny-roses)

21 8 / 2014

What they mean:

  • Black men deserve to die if they rob a few dollars worth of goods from a store.
  • Black men deserve to die even if they have their hands up.
  • Black men deserve to die if they resist arrest or defend themselves.
  • Black men deserve to die even if the gun they are holding is just a toy.
  • Black men deserve to die even if they are unarmed and doing normal things that white people do.
  • Black men deserve to die.

Read: 5 things white people say about Ferguson, and what they REALLY mean…