14 9 / 2014

silversarcasm:

how can you not see ableism as a feminist issue

autistic girls, especially black autistic girls, are misdiagnosed and underdiagnosed because of the focus on white cis boys and how they present as autistic

disabled girls and women often have their consent violated, both in medical procedures and otherwise, our bodies and minds are often not considered are own and we are dismissed as not having the capacity to make our own decisions

on top of that many disabled girls are seen as delusional and their speaking out about the abuse they have face, by whatever communication method, is often seen as them making things up and over reacting

many disabled women are fetishised and seen as an outrageous ‘thing’ to fuck, but are not seen as human

disabled girls, especially physically disabled girls, do not live up to ideas of beauty in our society and often have extreme self esteem issues

disabled women and girls face more shit than you could ever know and I need you to understand

Ableism. Is. A. Feminist. Issue.

(via disabilityinkidlit)

12 9 / 2014

I am tired of talking about feminism to men.

I know that I’m not supposed to say this. I know that as a good little third-wave feminist I’m supposed to sweetly explain to you how much I love and value men. I’m supposed to trot out my husband of nearly five years, my son, all of my male friends and relatives and display them as a sort of badge of honour, proof that I am not a man-hater. I’m supposed to hold out my own open palms, prove to you how harmless I am, how nice I am. Above all, I’m supposed to butter you up, you men, stroke your egos, tell you how very important you are in the fight for equality. This is the right way to go about it, or so I’ve been told. As my mother would say, you catch more flies with honey.

But still. I’m tired of talking about feminism to men.

Read more on Feminspire!

09 9 / 2014

thepeoplesrecord:

Fuck the (tone) police: Why men can stop telling me to be emotional about feminist issuesSeptember 8, 2014
Have you ever noticed how almost every debate or conversation between groups of men and women, especially those concerning the topics of rape and/or domestic violence, almost inevitably involve a man in the conversation telling one or all of the women to ‘stop being emotional’, or accusing women of arguing emotionally while asserting that he is merely arguing facts?
First, let me say – tone policing is boring. If somebody is delivering points in a way you don’t like, it doesn’t make their points invalid. It just means you do not like the delivery. Big deal. Get over it and deal with it.
Second — why the shit should women not be emotional when talking about rape/domestic violence? Let’s recap some stats:
1 in 3 Native American women will be raped in their lifetimes
1 in 5 Black women will be raped in their lifetimes
1 in 5 white women will be raped in their lifetimes
1 in 7 Latina women will be raped in their lifetimes
1 in 4 women will be the victims of domestic abuse
The overwhelming majority of these crimes, nearly 100%, will be performed by men. Even if the victim is a man, the perpetrator is usually also a man.
So I guess I just wanna know why some brilliant minds think it’s inappropriate for women to speak emotionally about a topic that so devastatingly affects so many of us?
And here is what I want to say to the women reading this:
It’s okay to get emotional. Cry. Scream. Be loud. Be aggressive. Talk how you feel. Feel your feelings and let it out. You do not have to be calm and cool and precise when discussing crimes against you, your demographic, your friends and family members. Men who insist upon this insist upon it for THEIR comfort. They want you to adapt your speech and tone to accommodate THEM. It is only and solely and entirely for THEM to feel comfortable in the conversation. To feel welcome. To exist in a discourse which caters to them.
WE DO NOT HAVE TO ALLOW MEN TO SET THE TONE FOR THESE CONVERSATIONS AND WE DO NOT HAVE TO NEGOTIATE TERMS! YOU DO NOT HAVE TO ACCEPT HAVING YOUR TONE POLICED BY A MAN WHO WOULD PREFER A DIFFICULT CONVERSATION BE MORE SUITED TO HIS OWN CONVERSATION STYLE!
Men commit the majority of these crimes. Women experience most of the aftermath. And then when discussing it we are also supposed to adapt our speech to make men more comfortable? Please. No. Go ahead. Subvert the existing white male dominated acceptable speech paradigm and get emotional. Get loud! Get angry! Flip the script. Why shouldn’t you? That is a lot of violence toward women. That is a lot of hurt. A lot of pain. Why on Earth would we not get emotional? You do not have to be cold, distant, calculating or use School English to discuss your pain or the pain of other women, the abuse, the violence.
Do not let men control these conversations. Stay loud. Stay angry. Stay crying. Yell if you want to. And if a dude comes around and tells you to tone it down because he can’t hear you if you don’t, kick his ass OUT of the conversation. Do not adapt to him. Have him adapt to you. Women have been adapting to the will and desire of men for far too long, and it is disgusting that even in conversations involving women and pertaining to topics that mostly affect women and include women that have been harmed in these ways, that any bro wants to just saunter in and set up the terms of what is and is not allowable in that conversation. If he cannot hear you unless you speak in a way that is agreeable to him, do not give him the power to change the tone of a conversation. Take the entitlement away. We can set the terms. We should set the terms. Let’s set the terms.
Source
-Applause-

thepeoplesrecord:

Fuck the (tone) police: Why men can stop telling me to be emotional about feminist issues
September 8, 2014

Have you ever noticed how almost every debate or conversation between groups of men and women, especially those concerning the topics of rape and/or domestic violence, almost inevitably involve a man in the conversation telling one or all of the women to ‘stop being emotional’, or accusing women of arguing emotionally while asserting that he is merely arguing facts?

First, let me say – tone policing is boring. If somebody is delivering points in a way you don’t like, it doesn’t make their points invalid. It just means you do not like the delivery. Big deal. Get over it and deal with it.

Second — why the shit should women not be emotional when talking about rape/domestic violence? Let’s recap some stats:

The overwhelming majority of these crimes, nearly 100%, will be performed by men. Even if the victim is a man, the perpetrator is usually also a man.

So I guess I just wanna know why some brilliant minds think it’s inappropriate for women to speak emotionally about a topic that so devastatingly affects so many of us?

And here is what I want to say to the women reading this:

It’s okay to get emotional. Cry. Scream. Be loud. Be aggressive. Talk how you feel. Feel your feelings and let it out. You do not have to be calm and cool and precise when discussing crimes against you, your demographic, your friends and family members. Men who insist upon this insist upon it for THEIR comfort. They want you to adapt your speech and tone to accommodate THEM. It is only and solely and entirely for THEM to feel comfortable in the conversation. To feel welcome. To exist in a discourse which caters to them.

WE DO NOT HAVE TO ALLOW MEN TO SET THE TONE FOR THESE CONVERSATIONS AND WE DO NOT HAVE TO NEGOTIATE TERMS! YOU DO NOT HAVE TO ACCEPT HAVING YOUR TONE POLICED BY A MAN WHO WOULD PREFER A DIFFICULT CONVERSATION BE MORE SUITED TO HIS OWN CONVERSATION STYLE!

Men commit the majority of these crimes. Women experience most of the aftermath. And then when discussing it we are also supposed to adapt our speech to make men more comfortable? Please. No. Go ahead. Subvert the existing white male dominated acceptable speech paradigm and get emotional. Get loud! Get angry! Flip the script. Why shouldn’t you? That is a lot of violence toward women. That is a lot of hurt. A lot of pain. Why on Earth would we not get emotional? You do not have to be cold, distant, calculating or use School English to discuss your pain or the pain of other women, the abuse, the violence.

Do not let men control these conversations. Stay loud. Stay angry. Stay crying. Yell if you want to. And if a dude comes around and tells you to tone it down because he can’t hear you if you don’t, kick his ass OUT of the conversation. Do not adapt to him. Have him adapt to you. Women have been adapting to the will and desire of men for far too long, and it is disgusting that even in conversations involving women and pertaining to topics that mostly affect women and include women that have been harmed in these ways, that any bro wants to just saunter in and set up the terms of what is and is not allowable in that conversation. If he cannot hear you unless you speak in a way that is agreeable to him, do not give him the power to change the tone of a conversation. Take the entitlement away. We can set the terms. We should set the terms. Let’s set the terms.

Source

-Applause-

04 9 / 2014

Shay Mitchell on Katie Couric Show

(Source: plldailly, via asongofsexandsociety)

02 9 / 2014

coveredinsnow-:

ilovemaydayparade69:

rubee:

"why dont you just give him a chance"

idk because im not physically or mentally attracted to him and ‘but he likes you’ or ‘but hes really nice’ isnt going to change the fact that im not interested

Damn, I don’t think women know how much that really hurts

image

01 9 / 2014

01 9 / 2014

"Pink"/Women's-Only public transit for women in Hyderabad, India.

If we let patriarchal thinking be in charge of addressing our problem it will frame it differently to our experiences. The problem will cease to be that our transit systems are failing to meet the complex needs of women, rather, it will become women are failing to cope with the public sphere. That’s right, we’ll come full circle – back to one of patriarchy/ rape culture’s favourite games: victim blaming.

Victim blaming is already an issue. Women are continuously framed as perpetual victims in the gender essentialist rhetoric of patriarchal societies. We not only require protection, but we need to learn to protect ourselves because that’s just the way it is (goes the reasoning). Coming back to public transportation, the onus is thus imposed on women to not be harmed when travelling. We have to impose a sort of unofficial curfew on ourselves in order to be protected from “bad men”.

Read more on Feminspire!

01 9 / 2014

"When nude photos are shared without permission, that woman is a victim of sexual harassment. She does not deserve to have her privacy invaded, and she is no less worthy of respect.

Never share leaked photos; your participation in this crime will only increase the suffering of the victim. If you know the perpetrator of such a crime, notify the police immediately; although there may be little than can be accomplished legally, the more that we discuss the need for regulation, the more likely it will be created.

Above all, never condemn them for taking nude or sexually explicit photos, as if that’s the biggest issue. Support her right to share photos of her body with whomever she wishes, without fear of mass publication of her private life.”

- Stop Acting Like Sharing Leaked Nude Photos Is Okay

31 8 / 2014

31 8 / 2014

Miranda Lambert, from "The House That Built Me" video.

What country music does at its finest is to tell a personal narrative. Too often, the history of rural small town America is either erased or falsified into an overtly nostalgic value set in pop culture. It is important to share these stories, and to open up this genre to voices we might not expect.

And some of today’s most talented female artists are keeping country doing what it does best—telling the story of an individual experience.

While country has a rich legacy of women like Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris singing to the plight of the working class woman, Parton is remembered as an appearance-consumed bimbo (or Miley Cyrus’s godmother, depending on your generation).

Should we really be surprised? Today’s country icons sing more out of the legacy of the Dixie Chicks and Miranda Lambert than Taylor Swift, a tone of straight-talk feminist lyrics that shows no sign of stopping.

Read more on Feminspire!

30 8 / 2014

woman writing

At this point in time I was a young Indian-American girl in high school who was angry at a world that I didn’t fit in. For the first time in my life, the books I read couldn’t help me because none of the characters went through what I did. None of them looked like an outsider. How could they? They were mostly white characters living among other white characters. 

It was at this time in my life that I realized that diversity was not (and never going to be) a choice to be made but a change that had to be made. It was more than a simple cry for change; it was a plea for change.

Read more on Feminspire!

29 8 / 2014

This week’s FPR begins by bringing you up to date with some of what’s happening with women from all over the globe:

Read more on Feminspire

29 8 / 2014

confessionsofayoungsexworker:

This guy sent me a dick pic so I google searched and sent back a bigger dick pic. This was the response.

confessionsofayoungsexworker:

This guy sent me a dick pic so I google searched and sent back a bigger dick pic. This was the response.

(via kateyvstheworld)

29 8 / 2014

glowcloud:

in general Calling Out Girls On Being Bad Feminists is not a job for men to do

29 8 / 2014

Video

(Source: sizvideos, via gaytoast)